Sergey Sirotkin 'Under the Helmet'

On Thursday 5 and Friday 6 July - the pre-race days at the British Grand Prix, I had the pleasure of photographing Formula One racing driver Sergey Sirotkin, for an exclusive feature about this up and coming Russian 22-year-old from the Williams Martini Racing team.

Before any of this could take place, I had to apply to the FIA to ask for accreditation, the criteria is notoriously strict. I wanted to somehow get behind-the-scenes to photograph the intricate and precise world of Formula One, working with one of the world’s leading Formula One teams, Williams Martini Racing.  

By photographing Sergey, I was aiming to appeal to a younger generation and to gain exposure in the emerging markets, such as Russia, China and the USA.  I pitched the idea of a story called 'Under the Helmet' to various well known glossy magazines in the hope that the feature would appeal to one of them to spread the word, after a lot of time, effort and rejection, a Russian magazine called Rútage London Lifestyle Magazine, replied to my email invitation saying they would love to feature Sergey and had been looking for an opportunity such as this for some time. At last my journey was on the right track.

The photographs above show Sergey 'walking the track' -  a ritual that happens on the Thursday morning before each race, when the driver walks the full length of the track with the engineers so they can get a feel for it, and to discuss any issues they may have. The Silverstone track measures 5.891 km (3.660 miles) and has 18 turns, this took place on the hottest day of the year and proved to be quite a trek, phew! 

The Thursday before the race is also traditionally media day. On this particular Thursday, Sergey took part in pre-arranged interviews including the one for Rútage London Lifestyle Magazine, autograph signings and fan-based interaction fun with his team mate Lance Stroll.

It was an eye opener for me as I didn't quite realise the number of people who were involved in the finest detail of the sport and the intricacies and technology of the cars. It is a physically and mentally challenging sport and the drivers have to be in tip-top condition to compete at this level.

 

My accreditation gave me access to the Paddock, I was also welcomed into the Williams motor home to photograph Sergey during interviews and whilst he was relaxing, I got to know the media team and to see just what goes into the pre-race days to make sure the drivers are in top form, physically and mentally for the challenge ahead.

I was also given access to an engineers’ briefing which carries highly confidential information, all the engineers (at least 20) and the drivers sit at desks in front of computer screens with headphones on, due to the sensitivity of the information I was only able to photograph close up of Sergey during the briefing, this takes place in a room above the tyre store, although the engineers are whispering very quietly into their microphones, it is so quiet you can hear a pin drop! I was so grateful for the silent electronic shutter on my Fuji XT-2, any noise or distraction would not have gone down well and I'm sure I would have been asked to leave!

The precise timings and dedication from all involved in the Williams Martini Racing team goes a very long way into developing this engaging, hard-working and most of all focused young man on his journey in Formula One.

I think you’ll find the photographs speak for themselves!

It was a privilege to have been given access to the 2018 British Grand Prix and to see first-hand how much work and money is invested in this wonderful sport. I wish Sergey and the Williams team all the very best for the future.

Before I go, a very big thank you to all at Williams, especially Sophie, Jacques, Emma and Ann for making this possible and for welcoming me into the Williams family.  To Anna at Rútage London Lifestyle Magazine for taking the story and of course to Martin Turner, former SKY Sports F1 chief, for showing me the way, I'm very grateful!

Stella

British Grand Prix 2018

I gained accreditation to attend the pre-race days at the Silverstone British Grand Prix on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th July to photograph Sergey Sirotkin.

Sergey is the young Russian driver currently competing with Williams-Martini, one of the worlds leading Formula One teams, to give a behind-the-scenes look at what this up and coming racing driver does in the Paddock before a race. The photographs will feature in a Russian, London Lifestyle Magazine called Rutáge, which is due for publication in August, once this has taken place I will be able to share my blog about Sergey next month.

Whilst I was in between photo-calls I managed to capture other Formula One racing greats, including Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas from Mercedes AMG Petronas; Ferrari drivers Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Räikkonen; Team Principal Christian Horner of Red Bull Racing and drivers Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen; Vijay Mallya, Team Principal of Sahara Force India and drivers Sergio Perez and Esteban Ocon. Others to look out for are Stoffel Vandoorne and Fernando Alonso from the McLaren Formula 1 Team, and Brendan Hartley and Pierre Gasly from Scuderai Toro Rosso, also George Russell currently competing in Formula 2. 

The Paddock was a hive of activity with drivers, technicians, engineers, media teams and crews, Team Principals and visitors, including tours for small groups of school children and children from Great Ormond Street Hospital - there were racing heroes from the past including Damon Hill signing autographs.

The photographs above are a selection from my two days, showing the Sky Sports F1 live broadcast on the grid featuring fun and games in front of the fans in the grandstands, autograph signing and interviews. To see a wider selection of images simply click here to the events section of the website.

To obtain media accreditation to the British Grand Prix I had to apply to the FIA requesting permission, stating the nature of my intended visit, once permission was granted I was able to bring my ideas together for the feature on Sergey Sirotkin.

The scrolling photographs above show the different passes that all media accredited people are given for security purposes, and to make their time and workflow efficient, these include car parking, media room, Pit Lane and Paddock access.

It was a fascinating and fully engaging experience which opened my eyes to the wonderful world of Formula One. 

Thank you to the FIA for issuing me with a Paddock Pass, Williams-Martini for their hospitality and co-operation, Rutáge for commissioning the story, and the other people behind-the-scenes at my studio, but not forgetting a very big thank you to Martin Turner for steering me in the right direction, without him this would not have happened!

I interviewed and photographed Martin last month for an 'In Conversation with..' blog which can be read here

Coming in August my blog about Sergey Sirotkin 'Under the Helmet' ...

Thank you

Stella

In Conversation With: Martin Turner

This month's In Conversation With... is with Martin Turner, Former Head of Formula One - Sky Sports & Sky Europe, BAFTA winner. 

Martin is Sky’s longest serving employee with 33 years at the coal face!

The photographs above show Martin at home in his garden with his beloved dog Sherman and in his games room with two much prized Bafta masks, one belonging to him and one to his father.

Q. What was your childhood dream?

A. To play any sport for England and tennis at Wimbledon.

Q. What did you play?

A. I was a tennis coach and an aspiring badminton player, Captain of Kingston Polytechnic and played for Woldingham. 

Q. What did you do when you left school?

A. I went to Kingston Polytechnic to study French and English. At the age of 22 I was a tennis coach for Club Med and when I came back I realised that I wanted to become a director in sports television.

Q. How did you get your first job at Sky?

A. I worked as a trainee video operator at Molinare, we were broadcasting SKY channel in the early days in the early 1980’s - I got to know the people working there and when a position became available I went for the interview as assistant transmission controller.

Q. How did you get into Formula One?

A. When Sky surprisingly got the rights to broadcast Formula One in 2012 I was asked by the MD of SKY Sports, Barney Francis, if I would create a specific sports channel for Formula One. 

Q. What was it like winning a BAFTA and what category did you win it for?

A. The BAFTA was for rugby union for England vs New Zealand 26-26 in1997 when I was 39 years of age. I mirrored my father's achievement for the 1966 world cup when he was 39 as well.

Q. What did your father do?

A. He was head of outside broadcast for Rediffusion and Thames Television.

Q. Now that you have left Sky how are you spending your time?

A.  I consult for Formula One management (the people who run F1) at Biggin Hill working with young producers in a mentoring and creative ideas role.

Q. Why did you retire?

A. After being diagnosed with Parkinson’s at the end of 2014, over the following two years my wife and I discussed how to re-evaluate the work life balance and we made the decision that the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix would be my last Grand Prix. Having worked full on for 33 years achieving a comfortable life balance was essential to our well-being.

I’m currently working with Parkinson UK on an ambitious project to lobby government for more research funds into this incurable neurological disease. This link tells you more.

The photographs below show Martin during his Formula One days looking very relaxed and at home.

Many thanks to Martin for taking the time to tell me about his career, I very much enjoyed talking to him and hearing about his fascinating career, the above is just a snippet about this illustrious man. I wish him well with his retirement which I’m sure will be just as fascinating.

Stella

 
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The London Classic Car Show 2018

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On Thursday 15 February, I packed up my camera and headed over to London’s ExCel’s Exhibition Centre for the fourth annual London Classic Car Show. For those of you who have not been, the show celebrates beautiful, classic motoring nostalgia in a dramatic setting and it is one of the highlights of my year!

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This year’s show was opened in a dramatic fashion by three well-known TV motoring presenters; Alex Riley (BBC One Show), Jonny Smith (Fifth Gear and Mud, Sweat & Gears) and Quentin Willson (BBC Top Gear, Fifth Gear and The Classic Car Show).  It was clear right from the opening that the show was going to be bigger and better than ever before. 

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Once again, an enormous indoor race track, known as the ‘Grand Avenue’, ran through the centre of the ExCel, enthralling visitors and allowing them to see – and hear – some of their favourite classics in action. The car above is a 1907 Stanley H4 Gentleman's Speedy Roadster, the hypercar of its era.

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Getaway Cars

The show paid homage to ‘Getaway Cars’.  This was an evocative tribute to those vehicles made famous in movies or used in headline grabbing real-life robberies and was curated by Philip Glenister, aka DCI Gene Hunt from BBC police dramas Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes.  

Alongside the vehicles made famous for dramatic escapes, the show welcomed their very own celebrity drivers with actor Nick Moran of Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels reliving various of his film roles at the special display. 

Nick Reynolds, the son of Bruce Reynolds, was reunited with the very Lotus Cortina that his late father used to stake out the Great Train Robbery in 1963. The Lotus has just 3,500 miles on the clock and is still fitted with the same tyres that helped the police to hunt down the gang!

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Nick Moran with the Italian Job Mini Cooper brought to London.

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Nick Reynolds with his father Bruce Reynolds' Lotus Cortina used in The Great Train Robbery.

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RAF Red Arrows and Aston Martin Owners Club

Squadron Leader Adam Collins from the RAF Red Arrows was on the Aston Martin Owners Club stand with a Vanquish S Red Arrows limited edition model, which was recently raffled for a huge £1.5m, earning for the RAF Benevolent Fund. He was joined by Humphrey Bradley from south east London – the lucky man who won the car.

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Lister Thunder Launch on the Grand Avenue

The opening evening witnessed a pair of major global car launches with two of Britain's most iconic marques unveiling spotlight-stealing new models. First Morgan took the wraps on its latest +4 Club Sport and then Lister revealed its never-seen-before Thunder. 

This year’s theme was ‘Specials’, which put the spotlight on an eye-catching gathering of road and race cars steeped in history and mystique. No fewer than 60 hand-picked classics were fired up for jaw-dropping, not to mention very noisy, displays on The Grand Avenue.

As the dramatic live show came towards its conclusion, the show opening trio of Riley, Smith and Willson selected four stand-out cars with a combined value of more than £3m to join the parade: a 1931 Bentley 8-litre; a highly-original 1961 Jaguar E-type; a 1992 Jaguar XJ220 and a 2015 McLaren P1 hypercar – a classic car of the future. 

The trio was joined by former Blue Peter and GMTV presenter Anthea Turner for the photograph next to the Lister Thunder.

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The Morgan latest +4 Club Sport takes its place on the Grand Avenue.

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Presenter Alex Riley with the 1961 Jaguar E-Type and 1931 Bentley 8 litre.

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A 1934 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Gurney Nutting - a shimmering silver masterpiece of the coachbuilders' art.

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A 1989 Lotus Judd Type 101, Chassis no 3 - an aerodynamically ambitious Camel.

Nigel Mansell CBE, closes the show

On Sunday, the racing legend Nigel Mansell CBE arrived at the show to talk about a special collection of his racing cars and to provide a fitting close to the event.

The 1992 F1 World Champion wowed Sunday crowds with some wonderful driving displays on the Grand Avenue, which included a wheel-spinning entrance behind the wheel of a Jaguar E-type inspired Eagle Speedster.

He later returned in a red Ferrari 246 Dino F1 front-engined F1 car from the late fifties and was also reunited with some of the cars which he raced during his roller-coaster career. 

At the end of his performance on the Grand Avenue, Nigel was awarded the 2018 London Classic Car Show Icon award.

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My closing thoughts

All in all, this year’s show was a brilliant experience from start to finish. Nigel Mansell CBE was a real highlight for me, especially his performances on the Grand Avenue, his interview at the Supaguard Theatre and his presentation of the London Classic Car Show Icon award. 

I hear the show attracted over 38,000 visitors and featured close to 700 of the world’s finest classic cars worth more than £300m. Next year’s dates for your diary are 14-17 February 2019 - I am looking forward to it already!

To see a variety of other photographs from the event please click on this link to the 'Events' page.

Please follow me on Instagram for new pictures and stories of future events on @stellasms and @stellascordellis.

Thank you.

Stella

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Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run 5 November 2017

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The London to Brighton Veteran Car Run is the longest-running motoring event in the world. More than 400 pioneering veteran cars (built before 1905), their drivers and passengers gathered in Hyde Park on Sunday 5 November waiting for daybreak to signal the start of the annual Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run supported by Hiscox.

Participants headed off for a nostalgic drive to the Sussex coast, where I was waiting to photograph them cross the finishing line to the rapturous cheers and applause of the crowds at Madeira Drive, Brighton.

This year the Run featured the largest entry in recent years, staged as it has been since 1930, by the Royal Automobile Club. The route this year took a detour to avoid the roadworks in Brixton as the map below shows.

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Although a number of cars were diverted following a road traffic accident involving one of the participating vehicles, 315 of the 401 starters made it to Brighton to claim a coveted finishers’ medal before sunset at 4.30pm. 

This year's Veteran Car Run marked 121 years since the original 'Emancipation Run', which was held in 1896 to celebrate the Locomotive on the Highway Act. This raised the speed limit for ‘light locomotives’ from 4 to 14 mph and abolished the need for a man to walk ahead waving a red flag to warn pedestrians and horse riders of its approach. The event’s ceremonial start includes the tearing in half of one such red flag, a poignant reminder of the liberation we commemorate on this annual ‘Emancipation Run'.

I particularly enjoy photographing this annual event because of the atmosphere and the fascinating history associated with each car, I have included some of the histories to accompany a few of the photographs from the day.

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The maximum speed the cars can travel is 20 mph, the first car above, to cross the finishing line at 10.45am - number 111, a 1902 Oldsmobile, 1 cylinder 4.5 HP driven by Andreas Melkus from Austria.

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Not far behind, above in car number 034, Robert Abery driving an 1899 Daimler, 2 cylinders 8 HP and car number 150 driven by Jiri Horice a 1902 Autocar, 2 cylinders 10 HP.

In all, 23 countries are represented in an entry list, which includes 34 new participants on the Run, while a further 18 have returned after missing the 2016 event.

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John Dennis driving the car above number 125, knows exactly where he was on Sunday, 1 November 1959, he knows exactly where he was on Sunday, 6 November 1960, too.
 
In fact, he can pinpoint where he was on the first Sunday of November of every year, ever since - bar one year in the 1990s, when he was in America on a business trip. On the first Sunday of every November, Dennis has been behind the wheel of his veteran car, making his way from London to Brighton.
 
Not just any veteran car either, but one made by his grandfather’s company 115 years ago. It’s a 1902 Dennis Tonneau, 1 cylinder 8 HP, built by the Guildford-based Dennis Brothers, a company better known today for its buses, trucks and fire appliances. This year, John Dennis OBE drove the same car – registered P 26 – for the 58th time on the annual Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run. The car however, will be on its 66th Run, having completed eight Runs with John’s father at the wheel in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

John and two other drivers who have taken part in 50 or more Runs are to be given special Gold Medals by the Royal Automobile Club in recognition of their remarkable achievements. John will be joined at the ceremony by John Kemsley and John Newens below driving car number 312, his 1904 Star, 2 cylinders 7 HP - who have participated in 50 and 61 Runs respectively.

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Passenger, Charley Boorman TV presenter, travel writer and actor with driver Damon Hill OBE, British former racing driver, above in a 1904 Rover, 1 cylinder 8 HP from the British Motor Musem.

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Above photograph of Malcolm Barber Co-Chairman of the Bonhams Group, driving car number 260 a 1903 Peerless, 2 cylinder 16 HP.

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Guy Middleton above, has been the proud owner of car number 218, a 1903 Wolseley Tonneau, 2 cylinders 7.5 HP for the past seven years, and his father before him the owner since 1984.

Guy has taken part in the Run on and off since 1983 as a passenger, he then completed a series of Runs in a single cylinder Bare as the driver.

I asked him to share any special memories about any of the Runs, this is his reply: "The first Run we had a puncture in Croydon High Street. Fortunately, we had inner tubes, a jack and some tyre levers and when we got going again we received an amazing round of applause for changing a tyre in about half an hour! A few Runs later we hired mobile phones (the ones that look like a brick with a rat tail), we had to keep it in the umbrella basket!"

I was also curious to know if he owns any other cars, and if so which was his favourite and why, Guy explained: "No, this is the only one and I have to look after it. We used it on our wedding day, to go from the church to our reception, so it does have a lot of great memories. At one point we had three cars in the Run, including my mother in a 1901 Baker electric. I shall wait and see if my daughters get the bug!"

Guy above, driving with his friends.

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Ms Quirina Louwman above with her children and with her father driving 'Genevieve' their 1904 Darracq, 2 cylinders 12 HP, from the Louwman Museum in the Netherlands.

This car was the star of the 1953 British comedy film 'Genevieve' - about two couples who took part in the Run. Always a pleasure to see 'Genevieve' and her faithful occupants at the Run!

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Above a 1901 De Dion, 1 cylinder 4.5 HP driven by Jerome Stevens.

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Following the Run were 60 auction winners who bid for a seat on one of three vintage buses.

The 60 Go Bonkers to Brighton auction was organised by BBC Radio 2 DJ Chris Evans to raise money for BBC Children in Need. In the three years Children in Need has been involved in the Run, more than £741,000 has been raised for the charity. Many congratulations to them for raising much-needed funds for such a worthy cause!

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Above Chris Evans, seen here with Pudsey Bear, drove one of the busses - the passengers were the auction winners who bid for a seat to raise money for BBC Children in Need.

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Above presenter Alex Jones from BBC One, The One Show driving one of the 1950s Bedford coaches.

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(Photograph supplied by MPA Creative)

Although the Run is not a race, in recent years the Chopard Regularity Trial has introduced an additional interesting element to the Run.

The Regularity Time Trial starts halfway through the Run after participants have regrouped at the Crawley half-way checkpoint. The Time Trial starts at Crawley High Street and finishes 13 miles later at another checkpoint at Burgess Hill in Sussex. 

Before the Run, each entrant will nominate the average speed they think they will maintain over the 13 miles – the options are 8 mph, 10 mph, 12 mph, 14 mph, 16 mph and 18 mph. If no speed is nominated, the default average speed is set at 12 mph. The car and driver that gets closest to its nominated average speed wins the watch.

This year’s winner of a Chopard Mille Miglia Chronograph, worth £4,900 is Ymer Sletter, who opted for a 12 mph average between the two points and came closest to his nominated speed. Driving a Cadillac dating back to 1904 shown in the photograph above (supplied), Sletter’s actual speed for the allocated section in the Sussex Downs was an amazing 12.01 mph.

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The crowds gathered to cheer and applaud the participants and their wonderful array of veteran cars on a sunny, but chilly Sunday.

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Above, an 1899 steam Locomobile, 2 cylinders 3.5 HP driven by Kempton Moody finished just before sunset.

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Safely back on the trailer and homeward bound!

Thanks for reading, I'm already looking forward to Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run 2018!

To view more photographs from the day please follow this link to my website. I'll be back soon with more news in the next week or so.

Bye for now.

Stella

Silverstone Classic 2017

The Silverstone Classic is firmly established as the world’s biggest classic motor racing festival. The epic event attracts more than 1,000 race entries and draws crowds of more than 100,000. The spectacular classic car celebration is staged at the famous Silverstone circuit in Northamptonshire, the birthplace of the FIA Formula One World Championship and home to the Formula 1 British Grand Prix. The three-day festival features the very best of classic and historic motor racing covering more than eight decades of motor sport, as well as live music from iconic rock bands and a wealth of family entertainment. In 2016, over 100 car clubs displayed more than 10,000 classic cars.

This is the reason why I look forward to photographing at Silverstone Classic, with accreditation to officially photograph - this blog shows a small selection of photographs I captured on the Friday and Saturday - to see more images from this prestigious event please click on each photograph to take you to the 'Events' section of my website.

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Henry Hope-Frost on the screen before the Royal Automobile Club Woodcote Trophy for Pre '56 Sports Cars - car number 6 - 1953 Cooper Bristol T24/25 - Qualifying.

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Friendly banter before the Kidston Trophy for Pre War Sports Cars - Qualifying.

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Crispin Harris in a 1960 Austin Healy 3000 about to take to the track in the Gallet International Trophy for Classic GT Cars (Pre '66) - Qualifying.

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Georg Kjallgren preparing to take to the track in a 1989 Courage C26S - Qualifying.

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Engineers with Team Captain Anthony Reid's Austin A35 preparing for the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race. 

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Theo Paphitis, part of the Screen Stars team, owner and the driver of this Austin A35 in the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race.

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Ant Anstead, with friend and co-presenter Philip Glenister from Channel 4's 'For The Love of Cars' in a jovial mood before the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race.

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After the Maserati Trophy for HGPCA Pre '66 Grand Prix Cars. Wiliam Nuthall came 3rd in car number 10 - 1960 Cooper T53 and Julian Bronson drove car number 30 - 1960 Scarab Offenhauser.

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Jonathan Kennard came 2nd in the FIA Masters Historic Formula One.

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Ant Anstead (Screen Stars) with Olympic Gold Medalist Rower Mark Hunter (Going For Gold), before the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race.

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Brian Johnson lead singer from rock band AC/DC before the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race (Rocking & Racing) - he didn't take part in the race following the qualifying session.

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Andy Wolfe preparing in a 1982 Tyrrell 011 for the FIA Masters Historic Formula One Race.

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Entrants in the pit-lane for the FIA Masters Historic Formula One Race.

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Greg Thornton won the FIA Masters Historic Formula One in a 1976 Lotus 77.

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Martin Donnelly (Rocking & Rolling), Steve Soper (Bike Legend) and Mark Blundell (Screen Stars) in a celebratory mood on the podium for the Silverstone Challenge Trophy - Pro Class.

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The Screen Stars team won the Silverstone Classic Celebrity Challenge Trophy Race – a new addition to the action-packed programme on Saturday 29 July. Led by former Formula 1 ace and Le Mans winner Mark Blundell, the winning team included Dragon’s Den host Theo Paphitis, Wheeler Dealers presenter Ant Anstead, BBC Radio 2 sports presenter Vassos Alexander, Sky Sports F1 pundit Tony Jardine and former Top Gear anchor Tiff Needell. Between them, the speedy sextet helped towards raising £10,000 for the event’s official charity partner, Prostate Cancer UK.

Left to Right: Tony Jardine, Vassos Alexander, Theo Paphitis, Mark Blundell, Ant Anstead and Tiff Needell.

Thanks for reading - at the end of August I'll be photographing at Salon Privé Concours D'Elégance with a blog to follow later in September.

Bye for now.

Stella

London Classic Car Show 2016

I was delighted to have been given the opportunity to photograph the Preview Evening of The London Classic Car Show on Thursday 18th February, having photographed the first show last year I was keen to see what was in store for 2016.

Guests included Jenson Button, Gordon Murray, Ari Vatanen, Bruno Senna, Jodie Kidd, Tom Ford, Jonny Smith and the evening was hosted by Suzi Perry.

One of the show’s main events was the Classic Six Nations Cup in which teams of ten iconic classic cars from the six leading car-producing nations vied for votes from visitors.

And when all the votes had been counted, the UK team – which included such varied machines at the original Mini, the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, Le Mans Bentley, McLaren F1 supercar, Aston Martin DB5, Land Rover and Graham Hill’s 1968 title winning Lotus 49 Grand Prix car – narrowly beat an Italian team full of Ferraris, Maseratis and Lamborghinis. 

Below are my highlights of The London Classic Car Show 2016 Preview Evening.

Jenson Button, the 2009 Formula One World Champion, made an impressive entrance driving a McLaren F1 – the supercar was celebrated at the show in a special display curated by its designer Gordon Murray.

Suzi Perry, Jensen Button and Jodie Kidd with the McLaren F1.

Classic car dealers crammed the halls with impressive displays of rare and valuable classic cars, many with six figure price tags. By the end of the show they delightedly reported sales of many millions of pounds.

A quote from the Event Director Bas Bungish:-
“If we were delighted by how the first London Classic Car Show was received in 2015, we were blown away by the response to the 2016 edition. From the moment the show opened right until the final curtain each day, the halls were buzzing with visitors. They loved the special displays and really got involved with the show: more than 9,000 for example, voted in the Classic Six Nations Cup.

“And the really good news is that we are already starting work to make the 2017 London Classic Car Show even better. Make a note in your diaries now: 23-26 February 2017,” said Bungish.

That's a date in my diary I don't want to miss!

If you have enjoyed reading this newsletter and would like to read previous ones you may have missed please click this link.

Thanks for reading, I'll be back once a month with updates.

Stella